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Benzo Rehab

Benzodiazepines, also known as “benzos,” are a class of drugs that affect the central nervous system. Moreover, they have a calming effect on the brain, making it less sensitive to stimulation. Benzos are also highly addictive and can create a number of physical and mental health issues when misused. 

If you need help ending an addiction to Xanax, Klonopin, Valium, or other types of benzodiazepines, call Northpoint Omaha at 402.685.9404 to learn about our benzo outpatient treatment programs in Omaha, Nebraska.

Do You Need Benzo Rehab?

Benzos are prescribed to help people with generalized anxiety disorder, insomnia, panic disorders, seizure, alcohol withdrawal, and pain management. They work by attaching to the gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABA-A) receptors in the brain, relaxing muscles and slowing the brain’s ability to respond to stimulation. 

The calming effect caused by benzos is helpful in reducing anxiety, but it is also what can lead to addiction because the desire to reach a state of calm relaxation may lead to overuse and misuse. 

As more drugs are ingested, the brain becomes dependent on benzos to block stimulation. Little by little, the body requires larger amounts of benzos to create the desired effects. The combination of dependence and tolerance makes Benzodiazepines one of the most misused prescription medications available. However, there is hope. 

The skills and support you receive from a benzo rehab center can help you end drug dependence and learn how to avoid relapse once your rehab program is over. 

Signs of Benzo Addiction

If you or someone you know has been prescribed benzodiazepines, be aware of the following physical and mental signs that an addiction may be forming:

  • Slurred speech
  • Dry vomiting (retching)a man talking to his doctor about starting benzo rehab
  • Drowsiness
  • Vertigo
  • Impaired coordination
  • Tremors
  • Extreme irritability
  • Mania
  • Rage
  • Aggression
  • Memory problems
  • Suicidal ideation

Like all types of substance use disorders, becoming addicted to benzos can lead to serious physical, mental, and social problems. 

In fact, individuals with benzo use disorder increase their risk of developing dementia by as much as 50%. Overdose deaths and accidents caused by vertigo/balance issues related to benzo use are also a concern. Additionally, prolonged misuse may lead to depression, irregular heartbeat, and coma.

If you’re concerned about your use of benzos or that of someone you care about, getting help from a benzo rehab center is crucial. A qualified benzo rehab program can help you safely withdraw from the drug and give you the tools needed to avoid relapse.

What to Expect from Benzo Addiction Treatment

The first step in benzo rehab treatment is withdrawal. Detoxing from benzos cold turkey or without proper supervision can be dangerous. Depending on the length of time you’ve been using the drug and the amounts used, withdrawal may include painful symptoms and emotional disturbance. 

That’s why it’s important to choose an outpatient benzo rehab that provides medical supervision during the withdrawal stage.

Patients can live at home during an outpatient program and continue meeting their everyday responsibilities such as work, school, and child care. Patients undergo traditional recovery therapies for a portion of the day and are free to return home once their scheduled participation is over. 

Some of the essential skills learned in benzo addiction treatment include:

  • Stress management
  • Identifying harmful triggers
  • Managing negative thoughts and feelings
  • Learning new skills to cope with life’s challenges
  • Relapse prevention techniques

If you’re searching for a benzo rehab center in Omaha, Nebraska, you need a qualified program with compassionate, understanding therapists and staff.

Reach Out to Northpoint Omaha for Benzo Rehab

Northpoint is proud to provide a benzo rehab center in Omaha, Nebraska, that considers each patient’s individual needs. Addiction is a disease of the brain. Therefore, recovery requires multiple levels of support.